Haden Hill Old House Ghost Hunt Report

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text] Haden Hill Old House Ghost Hunting Event Report 03.08.13 The Spooks Events team and guests were investigating Haden Hill Old House, West Midlands. We have hosted our Ghost Hunts at this Haunted House on many occasions, with good success at capturing Paranormal Evidence. The same with all Spooks Events Ghost Hunts, we had equipment setup around the house. This includes many EVP Recorders, Night Vision Camcorders and various trigger objects which can detect Paranormal Activity. At the beginning of the night we ventured around the Haunted House as a whole group to see what activity we could experience. Whilst in the kitchen we had K2 meters, Mel Meter and IR Thermometers to identify any changes in the temperature or EM Fields. […]

Haden Hill Old House Ghost Hunting Event Report

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text] Haden Hill Old House Ghost Hunting Event Report 07.04.12 The Hall original old hall has stood for over 400 years, built around the late 1600s and was home to the Haden family for centuries. In 1877, George Alfred Haden Haden-Best inherited the estate from his uncle, Frederic W. G. Barrs, known as the Squire. Haden-Best originally intended to demolish the old Haden Hall as he didn’t want to live in the old house following his strict upbringing from his parents and build the more lavish Victorian mansion as his home. But his elderly Aunt, widow of the Squire, lived in the hall, and by the time she died in 1903 he had lost the will to demolish Haden Hill old hall, so the two buildings remained side by side. George Alfred lived in Haden Hill House with two local girls, Emily Bryant and Alice Cockin, who became his adopted daughters. They were the children of local families, and he took them into his home and bought them up as his own. […]

Chavenage House Ghost Hunts Report

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]   Chavenage House Ghost Hunt Events Report 10.03.12 Some of the original buildings of some sort had been erected at Chavenage in the late fourteenth century. Parts of the present-day house are thought to date from around this period. At this period the fine medieval Cotswold barn (which now houses a modem squash court) was built on the adjoining farm. After the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII, the manor and estate were granted to Thomas Seymour, who shortly after Henry VIII’s death married his widow Katherine Parr and was subsequently created Lord Seymour of Sudeley by Edward VI. During 1549, Thomas was executed and his lands attained for his role in an attempted plot against the Crown. The property, then reverted to the Crown, was granted anew in 1553 to Sir Walter Denys of Dyrham and in 1564 Sir Walter’s son, Richard sold the estate to Edward Stephens of Eastington. […]

Clitheroe Castle Ghost Hunt Report

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text] Clitheroe Castle Ghost Hunt Report Report 17.02.12 Built around the time of 1186 by Robert De Lacy, the castle was an administrative centre for his estate. During the 14th century the Earl of Lancaster inherited the property, but after his execution it became part of the royal estates. Charles II then gave the property to the first Duke of Albernarle, who helped him regain the throne in 1660. Standing isolated on a rocky hill of limestone about 35 meters above the River Ribble’s valley floor, the keep of Clitheroe Castle is a prominent landmark for both the county and the town itself. The layout of the castle consists of an outer bailey, an inner bailey and the keep with its curtain wall and a gate house. Like all the best things in Lancashire, it has several claims to fame: it is one of the oldest buildings in the county; the castle is said to be the second smallest keep in England with rooms reaching only twenty foot square and it is the only remaining castle in Lancashire which had a royalist battalion during the Civil War. […]

Oxford Castle Ghost Hunting Event

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]   Oxford Castle Ghost Hunt Events Report 11.10.11 Oxford Castle was originally one of the many castles built by the Normans following their invasion of England in 1066. Building work on this Norman motte and bailey castle began in 1071, the motte referring to the huge mound which was built to protect the wooden fortification placed at the top. The mound, twenty feet high, still survives. As the Norman period continued stone towers and walls were added, the castle serving as a prison as well as a defensive position. Oxford Castle is then thought to have played a role in the turbulent power struggle that marked the end of William the Conqueror’s direct line. […]